U.S. Empire: Divergent Views

  • Alida TOMJA “Aleksander Moisiu” University
  • Daniel BORAKAJ

Abstract

The restructuring of the international order at the end of the Cold War created a unipolar system with the United States at the top, but at the same time, restored the language of empire and their categorization as an imperial power. Moreover, the foreign policy pursued by George W. Bush administration after September 11, 2001, prompted many researchers to describe the US role in the world as inseparable from this term. The debate is widely increased in recent years and the dilemma is whether to refer them as imperial or hegemonic power of this system. If it’s hegemonic nature would be purely obvious, then how can be explained that many researchers do not hesitate to define America as empire, especially after September 11, 2001? Based on the literature that deals with the US imperial character, this paper aims to answer the above questions, and to highlight that United States, do not possess anything as an imperial power beyond their Republican core.
Published
Apr 30, 2015
How to Cite
TOMJA, Alida; BORAKAJ, Daniel . U.S. Empire: Divergent Views. European Journal of Social Science Education and Research, [S.l.], v. 2, n. 1, p. 132-137, apr. 2015. ISSN 2312-8429. Available at: <http://journals.euser.org/index.php/ejser/article/view/1549>. Date accessed: 20 oct. 2019. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.26417/ejser.v3i1.p132-137.